Tuesday, February 3, 2009

Kim Hesse, former tree-protection administrator for Fayetteville, Arkansas, resurfaces as Land Development partner of Rausch Coleman Homes

Please click on image to ENLARGE view of Kim J. Hesse, managing partner for Land Development of Rausch Coleman Homes, after the former Fayetteville tree-protection administrator successfully presented for her company and gained unanimous approval from the Fayetteville City Council for her company's latest project in west Fayetteville. Hesse's understanding of watershed-protection best-management practices was a significant part of her success. Scroll down for Jordan on renters, Mike Ross, GOP recruit, and Washington County Quorum Court mistake below.



 
Council gives nod to third phase of Walnut Crossing
BY KATE WARD Northwest Arkansas Times
Posted on Wednesday, February 4, 2009
URL: http://www.nwanews.com/nwat/News/73695
Fayetteville City Council members approved the third phase of a 168-acre planned residential zoning district at the city's western edge and north of U.S. 62.
The third phase of the Coves at Walnut Crossing master plan consists of 10.5 acres and 38 singlefamily plots. The property is within walking distance of a city park and is just northwest of the Farmington School District.
"We haven't seen this concept developed in Fayetteville before," said Jeremy Pate, director of current planning for the city of Fayetteville. "It creates a mixture of home prices throughout the neighborhood. It's also pedestrian friendly and decreases the infrastructure for development."
Ward 4 Alderman Sarah Lewis expressed concern over the subdivision's impact on the Illinois River watershed.
Kim Hesse, managing partner of land development for Rausch Coleman Homes, said she hopes to turn a portion of the development into restored wetland.
"About two-thirds of the property goes to the south and the rest goes toward the north where the wetland is," she said. "It's very flat, so I don't think you'll have the erosion you're concerned about. This still has to be approved by Farmington though."
Also during Tuesday's council meeting, aldermen approved a resolution to name the Mud Creek tributary that begins on Mount Sequoyah near Root Elementary School Niokaska Creek.
Please click the following link to read the rest of the story:
Council passes phase 3 of Walnut Crossing on Feb. 3, 2009
Fourth-grade students from Root Elementary School's "Green Team" identified the unnamed tributary as a topic of interest during a class project aimed at involving students in local government.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Kim was the best tree-protection official that Fayetteville ever had. She now is probably making a lot more money for less hard work! Good for her!

gag me said...

This new development is on the edge of town (sprawl) and at least one alderwoman is concerned about it's impact. Lewis gets one line of coverage. Hesse with all her previous connections, gained on the public's dime by the way, gets the lion's share of commentary space and now it looks like she also gets a big old 'good-fer-her' for cashing in. So please, anyone with the objectivity to do so, please explain how another development at the edge of town that apparently destroys more wetland is something we need and should be happy about.

Anonymous said...

Yes, and Ms. Hesse's success up at Steele Crossing / Tarjhay / Kohl's is obvious to all.
Please.
If someone can answer Gag Me without using the words *economic development* or some such, go for it.

Anonymous said...

It looks like the praise is for trying to do some of the good things such as mix the price of houses and provide some for people who aren't rich or who don't want to be in major debt for life.
And getting some wetland preserved and restored is one of Aub's big goals, so not supporting it would not make sense for him. He has preached the same gospel for decades and seen little response. If you look back to Saturday on this blog you can see his attack on a failed site that is all wetland.
Growth will occur and maybe some of the rules will get changed to require better treatment of delicate ground if such efforts are praised and passed. Nobody has said this one is perfect.

Anonymous said...

I imagine aub will find something about it to criticize eventually.
He is dogged in checking on construction sites.